GRAVITY FALLS Season 2, Episode 7 Review: Society of the Blind Eye

Tom Speelman:

And of course this show is still good. When isn’t it?

Originally posted on Another Castle:

At this point, the Gravity Falls episode progression is pretty easy to guess. Either the new episode will be heavily mythology based, either delving into the ongoing story arc of the season or expanding the overall series mythology, or a highly entertaining one-off episode. “Little Gift Shop of Horrors” was the latter, while “Society of the Blind Eye” is definitely the former.

Come to think of it, this is probably the deepest Alex Hirsch & co. have delved into the mythos yet. A whole new layer of mystery is unearthed and quickly uncovered, some major character revelations are made, and callback after callback is given in an episode that, if not the funniest the show has been, then certainly the most exciting.

The Plot

Lazy Susan (Jennifer Coolidge) locks up her diner late at night and is walking home alone. Suddenly, she sees Jeff (Alex Hirsch) and 3 other gnomes…

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5 Ways THE LEGEND OF KORRA Proves it Can Contend With Traditional Anime

Tom Speelman:

Had this one brewing for a while. I stand by so come at me, Internet!

Originally posted on Another Castle:

Currently airing its 4th and final season, The Legend Of Korra, despite Nickelodeon pulling the show from the air and making it online-only, is still a huge phenomenon. Panels for the show at both Comic Con and New York Comic Con were jam-packed, and the show’s critical acclaim is still going strong.

Given that this final season is most likely the last we’ll get of the world that began nearly a decade ago with Avatar: The Last Airbender, it’s a good time to look back on the question that The Escapist posed back during the first season of Korra: Can Americans make a decent anime?  As writer Chris O’Brien posits, this shouldn’t even be a question. He points out that “anime” is simply the Japanese abbreviation for “animation,” similar to the American usage of the word “cartoon.” “Anime,” he concludes, “is more of a style than a genre.”

Anime…

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31 Days Of Horror: PERFECT BLUE

Tom Speelman:

Forgot to reblog this yesterday. It’s a very good film. Watch it with friends if you can. Better to facilitate discussion.

Originally posted on Another Castle:

Anime director Satoshi Kon only directed four films and one television show (Paprika, Tokyo Godfathers, Paranoia Agent) during his lifetime, but everything he put out was met with critical acclaim, both in Japan and in the West.

The overriding theme of Kon’s career was exploring what happens when the lines between fantasy and reality are blurred. His directorial debut, 1997’s Perfect Blue is a perfect (if you’ll pardon me) example. A gripping psychological thriller that exerts Hitchcock-esque intensity over the viewer until they’re no longer sure just where the real ends and the nightmare begins.

The Plot

Based on Yoshikazu Takeuchi’s novel of the same name, the film opens with Mima Kirigoe (voiced in English by Bridget Hoffman, credited here as Ruby Marlowe), the lead singer of the popular J-pop idol group CHAM!, announcing at a small daytime concert that she’s leaving the group to become an actress. That night…

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MEMETIC #1 Review: A Truly Modern Horror Comic

Tom Speelman:

A new comic from BOOM! Studios that’s a little like Stephen King’s Cell but more credible. It’s fun

Originally posted on Another Castle:

With the genre kicked off of its pedestal in the ’50s with the twin menaces of Frederick Wertham and the Comics Code Authority, horror in comics has taken a backseat over the decades, resulting in a niche corner of the market that either transcends the genre altogether or becomes a perfect example of it. The mainstream comics market being what it is, sadly, it seemed like this cycle was doomed to repeat itself.

But in recent years, the disciples of Stephen King have begun working in comics, and they’ve produced some great results. Scott Snyder (Batman, American Vampire, Wytches) is the obvious frontrunner, but there are several others and James Tynion IV is at the top. A close collaborator of Snyder’s who’s logged time on both Talon and currently co-writing the weekly series Batman: Eternal, Tynion has lately branched out on his own with Boom!, writing an acclaimed…

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The 5 Biggest Announcements From New York Comic Con

Tom Speelman:

I know I didn’t cover EVERY announcement NYCC made but I hit the big stuff, so that’s okay with me. Also, holy crap, I’ll be able to finally get Turn A Gundam!!!

Originally posted on Another Castle:

In just eight years, New York Comic Con has already become one of the biggest cons on the circuit, becoming just as vital for fandoms of all kinds to attend/pay attention to as much as Comic-Con International. Publishers and companies are noticing this, too, saving whatever big announcements or projects they didn’t announce in San Diego at NYCC. With the con officially wrapped up, these are the five biggest announcements we saw that got us excited.

Gundam Is Coming Back to America In A Big Way

Probably the biggest anime franchise that failed to catch on in America during the ’90s anime boom is Gundam. The franchise–a multiverse of shows revolving around teenagers piloting giant mech suits called Gundams in combat, for the uninitiated–is so embedded in Japanese culture that there’s even a 1:1 scale statue of the main Gundam from the original 1970s series, Mobile Suit Gundam (

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Unjust Health

Originally posted on Spiritual Musclehead:

childhood-obesityYou’ve probably heard it in the news off and on about the obesity epidemic in the US and most of all the issue of childhood obesity. According to WebMD, obesity is when you’re 20% over the normal bodyweight for your age and height with a Bod Mass Index (BMI) over 30. Morbid obesity is when you’re 100lbs over the normal bodyweight for your age and height and a BMI over 40. A large portion of people in the US are considered obese (WebMD even has a list of the fattest and fittest states in the nation).

The First Lady, Michelle Obama, has had a strong and good push for health and the fight against obesity. Politics aside (it doesn’t matter what your political leaning is, it’s still a good fight to fight) those who are fighting for ending childhood obesity and obesity in general are in many ways battling the…

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Which Version Of THE CLONE WARS Is Better?

Tom Speelman:

A big old comparison between the legendary 2003 Clone Wars series and the CGI version by Lucas that wrapped up earlier this year. This was one of the first articles for Another Castle I came up with and I’m very proud of it. I hope you like it.

Originally posted on Another Castle:

With Star Wars: Rebels premiering Friday October 3rd, Lucasfilm is going back to an era that hasn’t been explored in television before. The 20 or so years between Revenge of the Sith and A New Hope will be the focus of the new animated series.

This is a huge change of pace. Most Star Wars material released in the 21st Century so far has focused on the prequel era, specifically the Clone Wars. This galactic conflict–which, in-canon, only lasts about 3 years–has been the focus of many books, games and two television series.

It’s those two TV shows we’re talking about today. Specifically, the question of which one is better: Star Wars: Clone Wars, which ran from 2003-2005, or Star Wars: The Clone Wars, which aired from 2008 until earlier this year.

There’s a lot to talk about, so prepare to jump to hyperspace and dive right in…

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